The Author

William E. Moore is a professional archaeologist living in Bryan, Texas. His hometown was Park Place, a small suburb of Houston, Texas near Hobby Airport.  He holds degrees in Geography (BS) and English (MA) from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas and Anthropology (MA) from Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.  Currently, he is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA), an archaeological consulting business located in Bryan, Texas.  He has authored magazine articles as a free lance writer and is the author of  Bastrop County: 1691‑1900, published by Nortex Press in 1977.  He self published Guide to Texas Counties in 1975 and Early Homes of Huntsville (Texas) in 1976. Currently, he is putting the finishing touches on a book entitled Only A Memory: The Texas Calaboose and Other Forgotten Jails to be published by Texas A&M University Press.  He can be contacted through this website or by e-mail at bvracrm@gmail.com.

 

22 thoughts on “The Author

  1. GERALD CORKRAN

    Mr. Moore,

    I was the photographer for the Scurry County-Heritage Village Calaboose.

    Will Tiny Texas Jails-The Texas Calaboose and Other Forgotten Jails be available in book form?

    Thank you.

    Gerald

    Reply
    1. Bill Post author

      Mr. Corkran,

      Not sure if I replied to your question but I am now in the process of preparing a manuscript to be considered for publication in book form. Until it is accepted, I wish to not name the publisher but the firm is very reputable.

      Reply
      1. Bill Post author

        The book has now been approved by the University and I am working on getting a manuscript to the Editor ASAP. It will probably be available for purchase next fall.

        Reply
        1. Nancy Naron

          Hi Bill,

          My cell phone was stolen and I lost your number. Please contact me about the jails in Sealy. Thanks. Nancy

          Reply
          1. Bill Post author

            Sorry if I am just now replying but I’m having problems learning how to do some of this. I thought I had replied already but my cell is (979) 820-1984.

  2. jay Druesedow

    If you do not already have it, I can send you pictures of the one room jail in Carbon (Eastland County)

    Reply
  3. Lonnie Ray

    Hi Bill, I grew up in Somerville Tx, in the 40s and 50s and there is a calaboose there. It must be at least over a 100 years old. It was still being used as late as the 70s. It has been moved from its’ former location to a downtown historical park.I have pictures that I made about 8 years ago that I can send you copies if you leave your mailing adress.. I really enjoyed your article in theTx CO OP mag.

    Reply
    1. Bill Post author

      Lonnie,

      Thanks so much for your reply. I have already documented the one in Somerville. If you open the tab on my website called “Calabooses” and scroll down to the right county you can read what I have written about it and see at least one picture. When I visit a calaboose I take lots of pictures. Your statement that it was still being used in the 1970s may be new information. I will check on that. Since you were in Somerville in the 40s and 50s you may be able to tell me some stories about it. Anything relating to that calaboose that you can remember will be useful. I have one photo of it in the old location but if you are anyone you know has older photos that would be very helpful. Also, do you know anything about the calaboose in Snook? I have pictures of it and some locals say it was a calaboose and others say that it was not. There is one in Merle as well.

      Reply
  4. Lonnie Ray

    Hi Bill, Let me say that I left Somerville in 1960 going into the army and the caloose was still in use. The sheriff was Milton Lewis who owned the city cafe next door to Boones’ IGA grocery store down town on hwy 36. I knew Mr Lewis very well. I went to Viet Nam in 68 and came back in 69 and they were still using the caboose. Usually prisoners only stayed there overnight, or a few hours until they could be transported to the county jail in Caldwell or turned loose. As for the one in Snook, yes they had one there too. I saw it almost daily as we picked and chopped cotton all over Snook, Clay, and other small towns in that area.The one in Somerville was usually used on weekends as people would get paid on fridays from picking or chopping, and get liquored up and fight. There was a lot of knifing in those days and Mr Lewis was real busy on weekends. I know many a people who spent time in that calaboose including some of my friends .Well it’s been a pleasure writing to you and if I can be of further help, just let me know.

    Reply
  5. Jim Gantt

    Sir,
    There is a concrete building on FM 50, near the old steel store . Do you have any idea what that was ?
    There’s not much of it left but curious what it was in its day.
    I like your web site, and the info there in.
    Thanks,
    Jim

    Reply
    1. Bill Post author

      I thought I replied to you but perhaps not. I keep forgetting about comments. If you will give me more information as to where it is or send a picture I would appreciate it very much.

      Reply
  6. M C Toyer

    Mr Moore,

    I have only browsed a few entries so far but I’ve noted your comments about lacking later editions of the Sanborn Insurance Maps. The UT Library only published those in the public domain (1922 and prior) but later editions and revisions are available into the 1950’s.

    If you do not already have the information contact me direct by e-mail and I will tell you how they can be accessed online at no charge.

    Reply
    1. Bill Post author

      Mr. Toyer,

      Sorry I have not replied sooner. I would very much like to see more editions of Sanborn maps. Thanks for your comment.

      Reply
  7. Bobby Horn

    I have some questions regarding the Linden (Cass County) calaboose. Please contact me when convenient.

    Reply
    1. Bill Post author

      I just now saw your comment. I will be glad to tell you what I know. You can call if you want at (979) 823-1148 or reply through my website.

      Reply
  8. Dolores Herrington

    We have a sheet iron metal stamped out jail in Henderson Co. We have not found any other old jails like this one.
    All others are iron strapped jails.

    On the angle iron of one of the doors is the name “Carnegie”.
    We are trying to find out aprox date of the jail.

    Reply
  9. Dolores Herrington

    We have a sheet iron metal stamped out jail in Henderson Co. We have not found any other old jail
    like it. All others are iron strapped jails.

    On the angle iron of one of the doors is the name “Carnegie”.
    We are trying to find out approx date of this jail.

    Reply
  10. Shirley Saltarelli

    I was routed to your website from a post on FB about the calaboose found in Lockhart.
    There is an old wooden jail in Beeville, Bee. County that was restored and is behind city offices behind the Christus Spohn Hospital off HWY 59 just west of the Hwy 181 bypass in Beeville…It has some interesting features. ..I have photos that when I find them, I will send to you.

    Reply
    1. Bill Post author

      Shirley,

      Sorry for just now replying. I sometimes forget people actually send comments. I have not been to it but a friend has. Thanks.

      Reply

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